Commercial Incentives

PV Incentives

 

PV Utility Rebate Programs

*Administered by Energy Trust of Oregon. Used in conjunction with State & Federal Tax Credits

Solar electric incentives vary based on electric utility.

Energy Trust of Oregon website regarding Commercial PV Incentives.
Visit website >


Federal Tax Credits

The Federal Tax Credit is equal to 30% of expenditures, with no maximum credit. Eligible solar energy property includes equipment that uses solar energy to generate electricity, to heat or cool (or provide hot water for use in) a structure, or to provide solar process heat. Hybrid solar lighting systems, which use solar energy to illuminate the inside of a structure using fiber-optic distributed sunlight, are eligible. Passive solar systems and solar pool-heating systems are not eligible.

US Dept. of Energy's website regarding the Federal Business Energy Tax Credit (ITC).
Visit website >

 

1.5% for Green Energy Technology in Public Buildings

Enacted in June 2007, House Bill 2620 introduced a unique requirement for installing solar energy systems on public buildings. In 2012, S.B. 1533 amended the requirement to allow the use of any green energy technology (including geothermal electric, geothermal direct use, solar electric, solar thermal, and passive solar) to meet the requirement. The law requires public agencies to spend at least 1.5% of the total contract price of an eligible public building on green energy technologies. Eligible buildings include any permanent structure owned, partially owned, or controlled by a public if any of the following is true:

  • The building is used by the public;
  • The building allows employees use or occupy the building on a regular basis for a significant part of their work.

Only public buildings where the total contract price is $1,000,000 or more for a single building or a group of buildings on the same site, or contracts for major renovations that exceed $1,000,000 and 50% of the insured value of the building. Geothermal systems, passive solar thermal systems, or daylighting systems must reduce the building's baseline energy use by 20% or more in order to be eligible for the standard. Solar electric, solar water heating, solar pool heating, and active solar space heating systems must be installed in locations that have a total solar resource fraction of 75% or more. Geothermal and solar electric systems must be metered separately to record electricity production.

Before entering into a public improvement contract, a contracting agency must prepare a written determination of whether a green energy technology system is appropriate for the building. The State Department of Energy developed a standard form for contracting agencies to use in developing their determination. If the contracting agency determines that green energy technology is inappropriate for a particular project, they can refrain from installing such systems, but must reserve the 1.5% of the project cost to install green energy technology on a future building project. These reserved funds will be coupled with the 1.5% of the future project's cost that must be set aside for green technologies.

Oregon Dept. of Energy's website regarding the 1.5% Green Energy Technology Mandate.
Visit website >


Renewable Energy Grant


Oregon Dept. of Energy's website regarding the Renewable Energy Grant.
Visit website >


Thermal Incentives

 

Federal Tax Credits

The Federal Tax Credit is equal to 30% of expenditures, with no maximum credit. Eligible solar energy property includes equipment that uses solar energy to generate electricity, to heat or cool (or provide hot water for use in) a structure, or to provide solar process heat. Hybrid solar lighting systems, which use solar energy to illuminate the inside of a structure using fiber-optic distributed sunlight, are eligible. Passive solar systems and solar pool-heating systems are not eligible.

Visit the US Dept. of Energy's website regarding the Federal Business Energy Tax Credit (ITC).
Visit website >

1.5% for Green Energy Technology in Public Buildings


Enacted in June 2007, House Bill 2620 introduced a unique requirement for installing solar energy systems on public buildings. In 2012, S.B. 1533 amended the requirement to allow the use of any green energy technology (including geothermal electric, geothermal direct use, solar electric, solar thermal, and passive solar) to meet the requirement. The law requires public agencies to spend at least 1.5% of the total contract price of an eligible public building on green energy technologies. Eligible buildings include any permanent structure owned, partially owned, or controlled by a public if any of the following is true:

  • The building is used by the public;
  • The building allows employees use or occupy the building on a regular basis for a significant part of their work.

Only public buildings where the total contract price is $1,000,000 or more for a single building or a group of buildings on the same site, or contracts for major renovations that exceed $1,000,000 and 50% of the insured value of the building. Geothermal systems, passive solar thermal systems, or daylighting systems must reduce the building's baseline energy use by 20% or more in order to be eligible for the standard. Solar electric, solar water heating, solar pool heating, and active solar space heating systems must be installed in locations that have a total solar resource fraction of 75% or more. Geothermal and solar electric systems must be metered separately to record electricity production.

Before entering into a public improvement contract, a contracting agency must prepare a written determination of whether a green energy technology system is appropriate for the building. The State Department of Energy developed a standard form for contracting agencies to use in developing their determination. If the contracting agency determines that green energy technology is inappropriate for a particular project, they can refrain from installing such systems, but must reserve the 1.5% of the project cost to install green energy technology on a future building project. These reserved funds will be coupled with the 1.5% of the future project's cost that must be set aside for green technologies.

US Dept. of Energy website regarding the 1.5% Green Energy Technology Mandate.
Visit website >

Oregon Dept. of Energy's website regarding the 1.5% Green Energy Technology Mandate.
Visit website >

 

Renewable Energy Grant


Oregon Dept. of Energy's website regarding the Renewable Energy Grant.
Visit website >

US Dept. of Energy's website regarding Oregon's Renewable Energy Grant.
Visit website >

Are you ready to contact a solar contractor in your area?
Are you ready to contact a solar contractor in your area?

Support the Oregon SolarPAC!!!

OSEIA has started a political action committee to increase our voice and influence with our decision makers in Salem. Your donation to the Oregon SolarPAC helps expand OSEIA’s capacity to develop a marketplace for the widespread adoption of solar energy in Oregon. More information>

© 2016 OREGON SOLAR ENERGY INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION